10 Typical questions at a viewing appointment

Tuesday 16 November 2021 Vanessa Moret

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10 Typical questions at a viewing appointment

As a seller, you can prepare easily for a viewing appointment if you think about the 10 most frequently asked questions in advance and have possible answers ready.. In this article, we present the questions that come up most frequently in order to prepare you optimally for the viewing appointment.

By Vanessa Moret, November 16, 2021

The aim of a typical viewing appointment is for potential buyers to imagine themselves living in the property. For this reason the questions asked at a viewing are generally aimed at topics related to living in the property. But questions relevant to the sales process are also common.

1. Why is the house being sold?

Especially if a house convinces the prospective buyers, it is difficult for them to imagine why someone would want to move out there. So this question is almost always asked for fear of missing some catch. But usually the answer is simple and logical when owners want something smaller or a move to another city is imminent.

 

2. How long have the owners lived there?

Owners who have lived in a property for a long time can provide information about various aspects with more detailed knowledge. Prospective buyers also want to find out if there are any hidden defects, which is why the owners want to move. This is especially the case if the property changes hands several times in a short period of time.

 

3. How long has the property been on the market and are there many interested parties?

The answer to this question does not have to be judgmental at all, it gives an insight into the time horizon of the sale and helps prospective buyers decide whether they need to hurry or can still think a little. It also indicates if there is room for price negotiation.

 

4. Have the sellers already found their next property?

This is a pertinent question for planning the sales process and the possible moving date. 

 

5. What is the neighbourhood like? What are the neighbours like?

A property can be very appealing, but ideally the area and neighbourhood are also suitable for the owner. Leisure facilities nearby, a lively neighbourhood life or even the absence of it can be arguments for or against. Ideally, you as the owner are also interested in finding a suitable buyer who fits well into the community.

 

6. Are there any local plans that could change the neighbourhood?

This is mainly information that you as the owner receive from the municipality or transport operators, usually as a small information letter in the letterbox or on the municipality's information board.

 

7. What is the orientation of the property?

On paper, pre-qualified prospective buyers already have this information, especially since by playing with the natural heat of the sun one may save considerable amounts on the heating bill.

At a visit the prospective buyer may want to check this orientation and also see on site how the light falls, whether trees or bushes cast shadows and whether you are woken up in bed by the morning sun or not...

 

8. Have there been any major renovations recently?

When asking about renovations, it is also important for prospective tenants to get an idea on site of what work has already been done and what may still need to be done after moving in.

 

9. How high will the ancillary costs be?

Prospective buyers often ask about ancillary costs, because heating in particular is an important cost factor in the household budget. Experience values from the previous tenant help to get an overview.
The cantonal building certificate (GEAK) is also of interest here, if available. It is not compulsory in all Swiss cantons when changing hands, but it is most welcome to potential buyers because of the information it provides on the energy quality of the house. 

 

10. What exactly is included in the sale? (Greenhouse, additional shelves, cellar furniture, etc.)

It usually goes without saying that a property is sold without the furniture of the current owners. But in some cases, there is no room for all the furniture, the custom-made shelves or there is no garden to put the greenhouse in anyway in the new residence of the sellers. In these cases, there may be some items included in the purchase, which ideally will be accurately listed.

 

You won't go wrong if you prepare for these issues. It doesn't matter whether you do the visit or your estate agent does it for you. A big advantage of doing the visit yourself is that you get to know the potential buyers personally and can thus choose well to whom you would like to leave your property.

 

 

 

*collected by the Neho agents


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